Le Chateau d'Osthoffen - Alsace and Lorraine - France

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
   
 

Dating back to the Roman Empire after the conquest of Alsace by Caesar, the castle Le Chateau d'Osthoffen was part of intelligence measures to ward off Germanic incursions.
During the 12th century and onwards, Osthoffen became a fortified castle. Due to a siege lead by the Bishop of Strasbourg in 1410, fire raged through the building, depriving it of its 3rd floor. An ancestor, the architect von Seebach, rebuilt the castle as a Rennaissance estate and a private dwelling, its military mission finally coming to a close after the Thirty Years War (1648).
More changes came about with the 18th century: courtyard walls were removed and new wide windows enlightened both the façade and the interior. The castle lost its towers during the French Revolution by order of the new authorities, one of the first works undertaken by the new owner was to rebuilt them.
Bought in 1817 by viscount François Grouvel, the next 60 years witnessed 19th century modernisations. The Franco-Prussian War (1870/71) then tore Alsace from the rest of France. The family remained in place, however, a bastion of French tradition.
Yet more destruction took place during World War II with many treasures stolen or burnt. During the fifties and sixties Osthoffen turned resolutely towards Europe, hosting receptions held by the city of Strasbourg to promote this new ideal, an ideal dearly held by the present owner and his family.
During the fifties and the sixties, Osthoffen castle was used by the city of Strasbourg for the promotion of the European Institutions in Strasbourg. Many concerts and official receptions took place in Osthoffen.